education

November 15, 2017

Is American English Going To Take Over British English Completely? (scroll.in)

Paul Baker, writing for The Conversation: Brits can get rather sniffy about the English language — after all, they originated it. But a Google search of the word “Americanisms” turns up claims that they are swamping, killing and absorbing British English. If the British are not careful, so the argument goes, the homeland will soon be the 51st State as workers tell customers to “have a nice day” while “colour” will be spelt without a “u” and “pavements” will become “sidewalks.” My research examined how both varieties of the language have been changing between the 1930s and the 2000s and the extent to which they are growing closer together or further apart. So do Brits have cause for concern? Well, yes and no. On the one hand, most of the easily noticeable features of British language are holding up. Take spelling, for example — towards the 1960s it looked like the UK was going in the direction of abandoning the “u” in “colour” and writing “centre” as “center.” But since then, the British have become more confident in some of their own spellings. In the 2000s, the UK used an American spelling choice about 11% of the time while Americans use a British one about 10% of the time, so it kind of evens out. Automatic spell-checkers which can be set to different national varieties are likely to play a part in keeping the two varieties fairly distinct. […] But when we start thinking of language more in terms of style than vocabulary or spelling, a different picture emerges. Some of the bigger trends in American English are moving towards a more compact and informal use of language. American sentences are on average one word shorter in 2006 than they were in 1931. Americans also use a lot more apostrophes in their writing than they used to, which has the effect of turning the two words “do not” into the single “don’t.” They’re getting rid of certain possessive structures, too — so “the hand of the king” becomes the shorter “the king’s hand.” Another trend is to avoid passive structures such as “a paper was written,” instead using the more active form, “I wrote a paper.”

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